William Shakespeare Biography

Overview

Date of Birth
23 April 1564
Nicknames
The Bard

Biography

William Shakespeare's birthdate is assumed from his baptism on April 25. His father John was the son of a farmer who became a successful tradesman; his mother Mary Arden was gentry. He studied Latin works at Stratford Grammar School, leaving at about age 15. About this time his father suffered an unknown financial setback, though the family home remained in his possession. An affair with Anne Hathaway, eight years his senior and a nearby farmer's daughter, led to pregnancy and a hasty marriage late in 1582. Susanna was born in May of 1583, twins Hamnet and Judith in January of 1585. By 1592 he was an established actor and playwright in London though his "career path" afterward (fugitive? butcher? soldier? actor?) is highly debated. When plague closed the London theatres for two years he apparently toured; he also wrote two long poems, "Venus and Adonis" and "The Rape of Lucrece". He may have spent this time at the estate of the Earl of Southampton. By December 1594 he was back in London as a member of the Lord Chamberlain's Men, the company he stayed with the rest of his life. In 1596 he seems to have purchased a coat of arms for his father; the same year Hamnet died at age 11. The following year he purchased the grand Stratford mansion New Place. A 1598 edition of "Love's Labors" was the first to bear his name, though he was already recognized as England's greatest playwright. He is believed to have written his "Sonnets" during the 1590s. In 1599 he became a partner in the new Globe Theatre, the company of which joined the royal household on the accession of James in 1603. That is the last year in which he appeared in a cast list. He seems to have retired to Stratford in 1612, where he continued to be active in real estate investment. The cause of his death is unknown.

Spouse

'Anne Hathaway' (27 November 1582 - 23 April 1616) (his death); 3 children

Trivia

In 1994, Charles Hamilton, a noted handwriting authority, published his edition of Shakespeare and 'John Fletcher ' 's long-lost play, "Cardenio", which he believed had been masquerading as "The Second Maiden's Tragedy", an unattributed play of the time, apparently the sequel to a Fletcher collaboration with Francis Beaumont. Because the names had been altered, Hamilton's identification of the play with Cardenio has been controversial, but has not been refuted. Hamilton believed it to be in the same hand as Shakespeare's will, which he determined to match known examples of Shakespeare's handwriting, rather than having been written by a scribe. Hamilton died in 1996.

William Beeston, son of Shakespeare's friend actor Charles Beeston, described him as "a handsome, well-shap't man."

Family records 1564-1616 show 44 surname spellings.

In 1964, was the first person other than royalty to be portrayed on a British stamp.

In Manor Park, East London, there are streets that are named after him and his wife, Anne Hathaway: Shakespeare Crescent and Hathaway Crescent.

Pictured on a 5¢ US postage stamp issued to commemorate the 400th anniversary of his birth, 14 August 1964.

There are no living decendants from him. His family line ended in 1670 with the death of his granddaughter Elizabeth Hall Nash Barnard, who bore no children.

Two daughters and one son with Anne Hathaway: Susanna, Judith and Hamnet (twins).

"A great poet, a considerable philosopher, but, by modern standards, quite a poor playwright" - as described by 'Tom Conti' in The Times of London, 26 February, 2003.

A number of his works have been adapted for other cultures. There exists a Zulu version of "Macbeth", and a Japanese Kabuki version of "Hamlet".

He is listed in the Guinness Book of World records as having the most number of screen adaptations by a single author. The record for adaptations by a living author goes to 'Stephen King ' .

It is speculated by some that Shakespeare was inspired to write "Hamlet" after the untimely death of his own son, Hamnet.

The date of Shakespeare's death is April 23, 1616, only because Britain had not yet revised the calendar in accordance with the rest of Europe, which meant that the British calendar was ten days behind. If the calendar had been revised at that time, the date of his death would be May 3, 1616 (unlike Spanish author 'Miguel de Cervantes y Saavedra' , Shakespeare's contemporary, who actually did pass away on April 23, 1616).

Shakespeare stood as godfather to the future Poet Laureate of England, William D'Avenant (1606-1668), and D'Avenant would later claim that that Shakespeare was his father in more than just God.

Invented many names that were popularized by his plays and entered common use. These names include: Miranda, Jessica, Ophelia, Audrey and Viola.

His comedic play, "Twelfth Night" performed at the Donmar Warehouse, was awarded the 2003 Laurence Olivier Theatre Award for Best Revival of 2002.

His play "Macbeth" is considered by many professional actors to be cursed. Productions are often plagued by bad luck. The most superstitious of actors believe that the mere mention of the play's name is enough to cause disaster. To avoid this, they refuse to mention the play by name, calling it "The Scottish Play" instead.

'Laurence Olivier' called his writings "the nearest thing in incarnation to the eye of God."

In 1964, the 400th anniversary of Shakespeare's birth, there were at least four notable productions of "Hamlet" alone - the 'Richard Burton ' Broadway production, the 'Christopher Plummer ' made-for-TV film, the celebrated Russian-language film version (seldom seen in the U.S.), and 'Joseph Papp' 's Shakespeare Festival production, which was taped for TV.

Was the subject of a comic routine by 'Richard Buckley ' (aka Lord Buckley), where he was referred to as "Willie the Shake".

His father was a maker of gloves.

Portrayed by 'Reginald Gardiner' in The Story of Mankind (1957) .

"The Comedy of Errors" - only one of Shakespeare's many plays in which he mentions "America" (Act III/Scene 2).

Shakespeare willed his "second-best bed" to his wife, Anne Hathaway. Many scholars took that to be an insult, but this interpretation is incorrect. In 17th-century England, a home's best bed was reserved for guests; a husband and wife slept in the second-best one. Shakespeare's gesture was a sentimental reminder of the love he bore his wife.

His play Romeo & Juliet borrows many plot elements from the story of Pyramus and Thisbe. Both are the children of feuding families. Pyramus, like Romeo, is led to believe that she has died, and stabs himself to be with her. Thisbe then follows suit. Romeo & Juliet was later a partial inspiration for the play Cyrano de Bergerac. Both begin with a duel, and feature an iconic balcony scene. When Cyrano insults his own nose, he ends with "And finally, parodying Pyramus's cries, 'Behold the nose that destroyed the beauty of it's master features. It reddens with shame, the traitor!'".

The first patron of Shakespeare's company, The Lord Chamberlain's Men, was Henry Carey, the illegitimate son of King 'Henry VIII' .

The most successful American revival of one of his plays was Othello, which started in 1943 and ran for 296 performances until 1946. It starred 'Paul Robeson ' as Othello, 'José Ferrer ' as Iago, and 'Uta Hagen' as Desdemona.

Inspired the Royal Shakespeare Company (RSC).

His play, "The Tempest," at the Mark Taper Forum Theatre in Los Angeles, California was awarded the 1979 Drama-Logue Award for Outstanding Production.

His play, "The Tempest" at the Chicago Shakespeare Theater in Chicago, Illinois was awarded the 2016 Joseph Jefferson (Equity) Award for Large Play Production.

Several pop songs reference him and his work, including "Romeo and Juliet" by 'Dire Straits' , "Shakespeare's Sister" by 'The Smiths' and "Shakespeare in Love" by 'Layla Kaylif' . The British progressive rock band Twelfth Night named themselves after his famous play.

Quotes

We owe God a death.

Biographical Movies

Master Will Shakespeare (1936)

"Will Shakespeare" (1978)

Portrayed in

Shakespeare in Love (1998)

Lover's Knot (1995)

Alex and the Wonderful Doo-Wah Lamp (1978)

Time Flies (1944)

The Immortal Gentleman (1935)

Old Bill Through the Ages (1924)

Master Shakespeare, Strolling Player (1916)

"Histeria!" (1998)

The Comedy of Errors (1987) (TV)

Blackadder Back & Forth (1999)

"Upstart Crow" (2016)

Article

"Parade" (USA), 24 April 2016, pg. 4, by: Alison Abbey, "Party Like A Poet"

"The New York Times" (USA), 2 April 2010, Vol. 159, Iss. 54,998, pg. C3, by: Charles Isherwood, "Shakespeare's Sonnets Get a Turn on the Stage"

"The New York Times" (USA), 13 October 2009, Vol. 159, Iss. 54,827, pg. C2, by: Dave Itzkoff, "Shakespeare Wrote It? Computer Says Yes"

"The New York Times" (USA), 22 September 2009, Vol. 159, Iss. 54,806, pg. C2, by: Eric Konigsberg, "What's Shaking at Shakespeare's Grave"

"Contra Costa Times" (USA), 10 March 2009, by: Associated Press, "The Bard? Portrait Said to be Shakespeare Unveiled"

"San Jose Mercury News" (USA), 10 March 2009, by: John F. Burns, "A Newly Discovered Portrait of Shakespeare (Maybe)"

"Minneapolis Star Tribune" (USA), 9 March 2009, by: Gregory Katz, "Is Newfound Painting a Contemporary Portrait of Shakespeare? Or Much Ado About Nothing?"

"The New York Times" (USA), 11 December 2008, Vol. 158, Iss. 54,521, pg. C9, by: Janet Maslin, "What's Shakespeare to Us, and We to Him? Plenty"

"The Guardian" (UK), 26 November 2008, by: Anthea Lipsett, "Shakespeare suffers slings and arrows of Sats fortune"

"The New York Times" (USA), 8 November 2008, Vol. 158, Iss. 54,488, pg. C2, by: Dave Itzkoff, "Shakespeare Plays Will Head to the Globe"

"The Los Angeles Times" (USA), 22 August 2008, by: Susan King, "Shakespeare Through the Modern Ages: On Stage and Screen"

"The New York Times" (USA), 12 July 2008, Vol. 157, Iss. 54,369, pg. B8, by: Julie Bloom, "Shakespeare Recovered"

"The New York Times" (USA), 29 May 2008, Vol. 157, Iss. 54,325, pg. E2, by: Felicia R. Lee, "Extreme Makeover: Shakespearean Edition"

"The Los Angeles Times" (USA), 13 April 2008, by: Jack Lynch, "Searching for Will's Missus"

"Columbia Magazine" (USA), 2008, by: Morris Dickstein, "The Undying Animal: A critic reminds us why literature still matters"

"The Washington Post" (USA), 18 December 2007, pg. C8, by: Louis Bayard, "The Inner Bard"

"The Independent" (UK), 19 November 2007, Iss. 6581, pg. 10 - 11, by: Arifa Akbar, "Shakespeare's Inspiration [Love's Labour's Lost?]"

"Bookforum" (USA), October 2006, Vol. 13, Iss. 3, pg. 12-15, by: James Shapiro, "Much Ado About Shakespeare"

"The Observer" (UK), 1 January 2006, by: Stanley Wells, "What are you laughing at?"

"The Independent Arts and Books Review" (UK), 4 November 2005, pg. 5, by: Thomas Sutcliffe, "The poor old Bard's a bit past it"

"The Independent" (UK), 12 July 2005, Iss. 5845, pg. 16-17, by: Ian Irvine, "Shakespeare, Reduced: The RSC announced yesterday it is to stage all the Bard's plays at a special festival. For those who can't make it to the entire 37, Ian Irvine provides a potted guide to the plots"

"T2 (Times supplement)" (UK), 28 June 2004, pg. 15, by: Daniel Rosenthal, "No Fool Like an Old Fool?"

"The Independent" (UK), 25 June 2004, Iss. 5520, pg. 14, by: Ciar Byrne, "Devotees of De Vere, 'the real Bard', mark 400th anniversary"

"The Daily Express" (UK), 17 March 2004, pg. 17, "Lo, the Net's got your will, Shakespeare."

"International Herald Tribune" (USA), 1/2 March 2003, Iss. 37318, pg. 6, by: Roderick Conway Morris, "Illustrating an obsession with Shakespeare"

"International Herald Tribune" (USA), 27 November 2002, Iss. 37239, pg. 9, by: Sheridan Morley, "'Macbeth' for the modern audience"

"Arbetet Nyheterna" (Sweden), 24 March 1999, pg. 17, by: Eva Österlund, "Tid för Shakespeare"

"English Pages" (Belgium), 1961, Vol. XXV, Iss. 1, pg. 8-9, by: John Gower, "Shakespeare and the cinema"

Other Works

(1595) Playwright: "Edward III" (registered 1 December, with Anthony Munday; presumably by Shakespeare, though not proven conclusively)

(1596) Playwright: "The History of Henry the Fourth"

(1598) Playwright: "The Second Part of Henrie the Fourth, Continuing to His Death, and Coronation of Henrie the Fift, With the Humours of Sir Iohn Falstaffe and Swaggering Pistoll" (registered 23 August 1600)

(c. 1602) Playwright: "Troilus and Cressida"

(c. 1605) Playwright: "All's Well That Ends Well"

(c. 1605) Playwright: "The Life of Timon of Athens" (with Thomas Middleton)

(1607-1608) Playwright: "Pericles, Prince of Tyre" (with George Wilkins)

(1813) Playwright: "Cardenio, or The Second Maiden's Tragedy" (with John Fletcher; presumably by Shakespeare, though not proven conclusively. A lost play)

(1613-1631) Playwright: "The Two Noble Kinsmen" (with John Fletcher)

(c. 1591) Playwright: "The Two Gentlemen of Verona"

(c. 1591, published 1594) Playwright: "The First Part of the Contention of the Two Famous Houses of York and Lancaster" (presented in the 1623 First Folio in a revised version as "The Second Part of Henry VI")

(c. 1592) Playwright: "The Taming of the Shrew" (filmed as Kate - La bisbetica domata (2004) , The Taming of the Shrew (1908) , The Taming of the Shrew (1967) , The Taming of the Shrew (1929) , The Taming of the Shrew (1976) (TV) , The Taming of the Shrew (1980) (TV) , The Taming of the Shrew (1983) , The Taming of the Shrew (1988) (TV) , Ukroshchenie stroptivoy (1961) (TV) , De getemde feeks (1975) (TV) , The Taming of the Shrew (1911) , The Taming of the Shrew (1923) , Katharine and Petruchio (1939) (TV) , The Taming of the Shrew (1956) (TV) , The Taming of the Shrew (1973) (TV) )

(1592, pub. 1594) Playwright: "The Most Lamentable Tragedy of Titus Andronicus"

(1592) Playwright (with Thomas Nashe): "The First Part of Henry the Sixth"

(1592, publ. 1597) Playwright: "The Tragedy of King Richard the Third" (filmed as Richard III (2007) , Richard III (2005) , Richard III (1908) )

(1593) Poem: "Venus and Adonis"

(1594) Poem: "The Rape of Lucrece"

(1594) Playwright: "The Comedy of Errors" (filmed as "Kraft Television Theatre" (1947) {The Comedy of Errors (#3.12)} )

(c. 1594-95) Playwright: "Loues Labors Lost" (published 1597)

(1595) Playwright: "The True Tragedy of Richard Duke of York and the Good King Henry the Sixth" (1623 First Folio Title: "The Third Part of Henry the Sixt")

(c. 1595) Playwright: "A Midsomer Nights Dreame" (filmed as Stredoletní noci sen (2005) , Midsummer Dream (2005) , The Seasons Alter (2002) , A Midsummer Night's Dream (1935) ).

(1595) Playwright: "The Most Excellent and Lamentable Tragedie of Romeo and Juliet" (filmed as 8 päivää ensi-iltaan (2008) , Rockin' Romeo & Juliet (2006) , Romeo & Juliet: Sealed with a Kiss (2005) , O Casamento de Romeu e Julieta (2005) , Kebab Connection (2004) , Bollywood Queen (2002) , Fantastic Fantasy Factory (1993) , Romeo and Juliet (1916/I) , "Producers' Showcase" (1954) {Romeo and Juliet (#3.7)} ).

(1596) Playwright: "The Tragedy of King Richard the Second" (published 1597)

(1596) Playwright: "The Life and Death of King John"

(c. 1598) Playwright: "The Comical History of the Merchant of Venice, or otherwise called The Jew of Venice" (filmed as The Merchant of Venice (2004) , Shakespeare's Merchant (2003) ,

(1597) Playwright: "The Merry Wives of Windsor" (filmed as As Alegres Comadres (2003) ,

(c. 1597) Playwright: "Loue Labours Wonne" (lost)

(Feb. 1598) Playwright: "The History of Henry the Fourth" (registered 23 August 1600)

(1598) Playwright: "Much Adoe about Nothing" (registered 4 August 1600)

(1599) Playwright: "The Life of Henry the Fifth" (filmed as Henry V (2003) ,

(1599) Playwright: "The Tragedy of Julius Caesar" (filmed as Gedebe (2003) ,

(1599) Poetry collection: "The Passionate Pilgrim" (unauthorized collection)

(c. 1599-1600) Playwright: "As You Like It" (filmed as As You Like It (2006) ,

(1600) Playwright: "The Tragedy of Hamlet, Prince of Denmark" (filmed as Hamlet A.D.D. (2014) , Hamlet (2008) , Hamlet (2007/III) , Ye yan (2006) , Hamlet (2005/II) , Hamlet (2005) , Prince of the Himalayas (2006) , Hamlet (2004) (TV) , Hamlet X (2004) , Hamlet (2003) , Hamlet: For the Love of Ophelia (1995) ).

(c. 1601) Playwright: "Twelfth Night, Or What You Will" (filmed as She's the Man (2006) ,

(1601) Poem: "A Song"

Playwright: "The Booke of Sir Thomas More" (1603 revision of Anthony Munday, Henry Chettle, and Thomas Dekker's c. 1592-93 play, "Sir Thomas More", with Henry Chettle, Thomas Heywood, Thomas Dekker, and a playhouse scribe)

(1604) Playwright: "Measure for Measure" (filmed as Measure for Measure (2006) .

(1604) Playwright: "The Tragedy of Othello the Moore of Venice" (filmed as Omkara (2006) , Souli (2004) , Huapango (2004) .

(Dec 1607-Jan 1608) Playwright: "M. William Shak-speare: His True Chronicle of Historie of the Life and Death of King Lear and His Three daughters, with the Unfortunate Life of Edgar, Sonne and Heire to the Earle of Gloster, and His Sullen and Assumed Humor of Tom of Bedlam"

(1623) Playwright: "The Tragedie of King Lear" (First Folio revision, modern versions usually conflate the two versions; filmed as "Omnibus" (1952) {King Lear (#2.3)} , King Lear (1983) (TV) , King Lear (1971) , Korol Lir (1971) , King Lear (1987) , "Omnibus" (1952) {King Lear (#2.3)} , "King Lear" (1974) , King Lear (1982) (TV) , King Lear (1999) , King Lear (2008) (TV) , Re Lear (1910/II) , King Lear (1909) , King Lear (1916) , The Tragedy of King Lear Part 1 (1948) (TV) , King Lear (1976) , King Lear (2000) ).

(1606) Playwright: "The Tragedy of Macbeth" (filmed as Enemy of Man (????) , Macbeth (2010), Macbeth (2006/I) , Macbeth 3000: This Time, It's Personal (2005) , Macbeth (2004/I) , Halálos halál (2004) , Shakespeare 4 Kidz: Macbeth (2004) , Maqbool (2003) , Macbeth (2003) , Macbeth (1908) )

(late 1606-early 1607) Playwright: "The Tragedie of Anthonie, and Cleopatra". NOTE: Filmed as Marcantonio e Cleopatra (1913) .

(1607-08) Playwright: "Pericles, Prince of Tyre"

(1608) Playwright: "The Tragedy of Coriolanus"

(1609) Poetry collection: "Shake-speares Sonnets" (including the poem "A Lover's Complaint")

(c. 1609-1611) Playwright: "The Winter's Tale" (filmed as Apa khabar orang kampung (2007) , The Winter's Tale (1910) )

(1609-1610) Playwright: "Cymbeline, King of Britain"

(1611) Playwright: "The Tempest" (filmed as The Tempest (2001) , Forbidden Planet (1956) )

(1613) Playwright: "All Is True: The Famous History of the Life of Henry VIII" (with John Fletcher)

(1899) Stage: Wrote "King John," performed with Sir 'Herbert Beerbohm Tree' ; 'Lewis Waller' ; and 'Julia Neilson' in the cast; on the West End at Her Majesty's Theatre, London, England, UK.

(1898) Stage: Wrote "Julius Caesar," with Sir 'Herbert Beerbohm Tree' ; 'Lewis Waller' ; and 'Evelyn Millard' in the cast; on the West End at Her Majesty's Theatre, London, England, UK.

(1967-1968) His play, "Hamlet," was performed in an American Conservatory Theatre production at the Geary and Marine Memorial Theatres in San Francisco, California. William Ball was director.

(1967-1968) His play, "Twelfth Night," was performed in an American Conservatory Theatre production at the Geary and Marine Memorial Theatres in San Francisco, California. William Ball was director.

(1970) His play, "The Tempest," was performed in an American Conservatory Theatre production at the Geary and Marine Memorial Theatres in San Francisco, California. William Ball was director.

(1970-1971) His play, "The Merchant of Venice," was performed in an American Conservatory Theatre production at the Geary and Marine Memorial Theatres in San Francisco, California. Ellis Rabb was director.

(1971-1972) His play, "Antony and Cleopatra," was performed in an American Conservatory Theatre production at the Geary and Marine Memorial Theatres in San Francisco, California. Allen Fletcher was director.

(1972-1973) His play, "The Merchant of Venice," was performed in an American Conservatory Theatre production at the Geary and Marine Memorial Theatres in San Francisco, California. Robert Bonaventura was director.

(1970-1971) His play, "The Tempest," was performed in an American Conservatory Theatre production at the Geary and Marine Memorial Theatres in San Francisco, California. William Ball was director.

(1973-1974) His play, "The Taming of the Shrew," was performed in an American Conservatory Theatre production in San Francisco, California. William Ball was director.

(1974-1975) His play, "King Richard III," was performed in an American Conservatory Theatre production in San Francisco, California. William Ball was director.

(1975-1976) His play, "The Merry Wives of Windsor," was performed in an American Conservatory Theatre production in San Francisco, California. Jon Jory was director.

(1974-1975) His play, "The Taming of the Shrew," was performed in an American Conservatory Theatre production in San Francisco, California. William Ball was director.

(1975-1976) His play, "The Taming of the Shrew," was performed in an American Conservatory Theatre production. William Ball was director.

(1977-1978) His play, "Julius Caesar," was performed in an American Conservatory Theatre production. Edward Payson Call was director.

(1976-1977) His play, "Othello," was performed in an American Conservatory Theatre production. Allen Fletcher was director.

(1975-1976) His play, "The Taming of the Shrew," was performed in an American Conservatory Theatre production in San Francisco, California. William Ball was director.

(1976-1977) His play, "Othello," was performed in an American Conservatory Theatre production in San Francisco, California. Allen Fletcher was director.

(1977-1978) His play, "Julius Caesar," in an American Conservatory Theatre production in San Francisco, California. Edward Payson Call was director.

(1979-1980) His play, "The Winter's Tale," was performed in an American Conservatory Theatre production in San Francisco, California. Allen Fletcher was director.

(1980-1981) His play, "Much Ado About Nothing," was performed in an American Conservatory Theatre production in San Francisco, California. Jerry Turner was director.

(1979-1980) His play, "Romeo and Juliet," was performed in an American Conservatory Theatre production in San Francisco, California. Allen Fletcher was director.

(1978-1979) His play, "The Winter's Tale," was performed in an American Conservatory Theatre production in San Francisco, California. William Ball was director.

(1981-1982) His play,"Richard II," was performed in an American Conservatory Theatre production in San Francisco, California. Elizabeth Huddle was director.

(1983-1984) His play, "A Midsummer's Night Dream," was performed in an American Conservatory Theatre production in San Francisco, California. James Edmondson was director.

(1984-1985) His play, "Macbeth," was performed in an American Conservatory Theatre production in San Francisco, California. Edward Hastings was director.

(1987-1988) His play, "King Lear," was performed in a American Conservatory Theatre production in San Francisco, California. Edward Hastings was director.

(1990-1991) His play, "Hamlet," was performed in an American Conservatory Theatre production in San Francisco, California. John C. Fletcher was director.

(1989-1990) His play, "Twelfth Night, or What You Will," was performed in an American Conservatory Theatre production in San Francisco, California. John C. Fletcher was director.

(1995-1996) His play, "The Tempest," was performed in an American Conservatory Theatre production in San Francisco, California. Carey Perloff was director.

(1994-1995) His play, "Othello," was performed in an American Conservatory Theatre production in San Francisco, California. Richard Seyd was director.

(January 24, 1996) His play, "The Tempest," was performed in an American Conservatory Theatre production at the Geary Theater in San Francisco, California with David Straithairn (Prospero) and the Kronos Quartet in the cast. Carey Perloff was director. David Lang was composer.

(October 10, 1991 to November 17, 1991) His play, "Hamlet," was performed at the Public Theater in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

(July 1, 1982 to August 15, 1982) His play, "A Midsummer's Night Dream," was performed at the Public Theater in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

(April 23, 1981 to June 7, 1981) His play, "The Two Gentlemen of Verona," was performed at the Public Theater in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

(December 22, 1976 to January 23, 1977) His play, "Henry V," was performed at the Public Theater in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

(May 1 to May 13, 1951) His play, "Julius Caesar," was performed at The Arena Stage Theatre in Washington D.C. Edward Mangum was director.

(1974-1975 Season) His play, "Julius Caesar," was performed at The Arena Stage Theatre in Washington D.C. Carl Weber was director.

(September 17 to October 31, 1995) His play, "Twelfth Night," was performed in The Arena Stage Theatre production at the Fichlander Theater in Washington D.C. Douglas C. Wager was director.

(May 6 to July 1, 1979) His play, "The Tempest," was performed at the Mark Taper Forum Theatre in Los Angeles, California. John Hirsch was director.

(2015-2016 season) His play, "The Tempest," was performed at the Chicago Shakespeare Theater in Chicago, Illinois with Nate Dendy (Ariel) in the cast. Aaron Posner and Teller were directors. Thom Weaver was lighting designer. Johnny Thompson was magic designer.

(November 25 to December 20, 2016) His play, "Measure for Measure," was performed in a Fiasco Theater and Long Wharf Theatre production on Claire Tow Stage in the C. Newton Schenck III Theatre in New Haven, Connecticut. Noah Brady and Ben Steinfeld were directors. Derek McLane was set designer. Whitney Locher was costume designer. Christopher Akerlind was lighting designer. Matthew Melchiorre was production stage manager. Amy Patricia Stern was assistant stage manager.